Tag: #phoenix

Minister Issues Written Apology to All Affected by Phoenix

Minister Issues Written Apology to All Affected by Phoenix

August 26, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

The Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) has issued a written apology to all Government of Canada employees affected by the public service’s new pay system, Phoenix.

It comes almost two and a half years since the Associate Deputy of PSPC and pay modernization at the time, Renée Jolicoeur, received the Outstanding Achievement Award for various career accomplishments which is considered, “the highest expression of recognition for senior public servants in the Public Service of Canada.”

One of Jolicoeur’s career accomplishments listed was, “transforming the Government’s outdated pension administration into a seamless and centralized electronic system, and modernizing the compensation function by creating a fully automated and consolidated compensation service centre.

She launched the pay modernization and consolidation initiative to modernize a 40-year-old IT system and to create a compensation service centre through the consolidation of all pay advisory services and functions for government departments. She has been instrumental in working across government and with bargaining agents to mobilize compensation advisors in support of this important initiative, as well as with the Government of New Brunswick and post-secondary institutions to develop a training and recruitment initiative to create a pool of skilled compensation service providers.”

The Prime Minister at the time was quoted as saying, “Ms. Jolicoeur is a world-class innovator who has transformed outdated government pension and pay systems into cutting edge operations that have saved taxpayers money, provided better services to Canadians, and which are envied around the world.”

Fast forward to last week when the Minister of PSPC said that the cost to fix Phoenix has so far totalled $25 million and counting.

And this week, unions have continued to be vocal in their claims that they weren’t heard when they issued warnings about Phoenix:

Read the Minister’s written apology to public servants below:

No one should have to worry about being paid for work performed. The pay problems experienced by some of our employees are unacceptable. To the public servants and families impacted by the issues with the public service pay system, I am sorry. Please accept my apologies.

Fixing this situation is a top priority for me.

We have added more staff to the Pay Centre in Miramichi and created four satellite pay units to fix pay problems faster. We will continue to hire as many additional pay advisors as we can. I have seen firsthand how hard employees in these centres are working to fix problems with speed and accuracy. I thank them for their service.

Priority is being given to those individuals most at risk. In the meantime, employees can request and receive emergency payments from their department, which can be issued within 24-48 hours.

We are working with our colleagues at Treasury Board Secretariat to ensure affected employees who have incurred costs resulting from the implementation of the new pay system will be able to submit a claim to be reimbursed for these expenses.

We have also made it easier for employees to get information. An enhanced call centre is in place and Public Services and Procurement Canada is providing regular updates on its website and via public technical briefings.

Unions are providing important assistance by identifying employee pay problems and supporting solutions, such as the hiring of compensation advisors. Last week I met with union representatives as part of this partnership. All parties expressed a shared concern for employees and we committed to keep working together to support them and remain responsive to their needs.

While there is still a significant number of affected employees, we are making progress. Outstanding issues are being resolved, and this work is happening as quickly as possible. Anyone who has a pay problem can get help by calling Public Services and Procurement Canada at 1-855-686-4729 or by completing the department’s online feedback form. That form may also be used to request an emergency salary payment.

We are committed to addressing issues caused by the pay transformation initiative. The determination and dedication of employees throughout the Government to help resolve this unacceptable pay situation, will ensure we get through this challenging period together.

Judy M. Foote
Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Other Links

Read the Minister’s written apology on the Public Services and Procurement Canada’s website here.

Clerk Breaks Silence on Phoenix and Shared Services Canada

Clerk Breaks Silence on Phoenix and Shared Services Canada

August 4, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Clerk Michael Wernick gave a one-on-one interview last week, opening up about the embattled Phoenix pay system and the constant criticism from public servants and departments of Shared Services Canada (SSC).

Shared Services Canada

If anyone was hoping for the slightest possibility that the public service might do a 180 on its IT approach and devolve SSC, returning IT ownership to individual departments, think again.

“We have no choice but to move forward with SSC. The idea that over 300 federal organizations were going to fix and modernize and recapitalize their IT, one at a time, by going to Treasury Board and Finance and building independent systems, is a fantasy scenario. We had to do it together.”

The Clerk was asked if he’d given any direction to SSC since he became Clerk, “No, we have an accountable deputy minister and head of SSC. I have told the deputy minister community that Shared Services Canada is here to stay, and we need an agency that is a service provider that is listening and open to its clients, and we need clients that are willing to work and engage with the service provider. When those relationships work well then we do very well.”

But when asked how he thought SSC had been operating thus far, the Clerk replied, “It’s a work in progress, obviously. Shared Services Canada is barely three and a half years old. It is a massive undertaking to transform IT of the largest organization in the country.

The only way to have adequate cyber protection around the information that departments are the custodians of is to have a strong perimeter defence. And the only way to do that — and this has been said many times by the head of the Communication Security Establishment — is to put departments and agencies behind the firewalls and the defences of Shared Services Canada.

So there are transition issues of migrating from where we have been to where we need to go, but I am quite determined that we have to have shared IT infrastructure in the government of Canada.”

Phoenix

Next, the Clerk was asked about his reaction to learning that public servants had to quit their jobs because of the problems associated with the public service pay system, Phoenix.

“Every department and agency in the federal government has the ability to issue emergency cheques and advances, and there is no reason for anybody to be without cash. And in many of the cases that have popped up in the media, people have, in fact, been given cash advances against the compensation that they’re owed.

The best thing for people to do is to go to the website, file their case online, or call the call centre and make sure that the pay file catches up with them, but there is no reason for anybody to be without cash.”

Other Links

Follow the Clerk on Facebook here.

Read the full length interview here.

Deputy Minister for Phoenix Provides Update – July 28

Deputy Minister for Phoenix Provides Update – July 28

August 2, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

The Deputy Minister responsible for overseeing the implementation of Phoenix provided another update to all public servants last week, saying that the timeline for resolving pay issues would run until the end of October.

At the same time, public servants took to social media to demand accountability, and compensation advisors reiterated that neither senior management, nor unions listened years ago when they advised that Phoenix wouldn’t work, nor did unions protect those who were faced with losing their jobs:

“Not only did mgt not listen, the unions didn’t listen nor did they stand up for us.”

In last week’s update, there was news that a new call centre has been established in Toronto with 100 agents and more to come.

Up until now, public servants have not been able to reach anyone at the pay centre in Miramichi with callers waiting endlessly on hold, getting a busy signal or being hung up on.

Public Works says this new call centre will ensure that all employees are able to speak to someone with a minimal wait time, while reducing the burden at Miramichi and reducing the number of dropped calls.

In one day, the Toronto call centre received 2,500 calls with Public Works maintaining that no calls were dropped and the average wait time was under four minutes.

Public Works says that call centre agents there will be able to provide updates on when pay requests will be addressed and how long they will take to be resolved. Public servants with more complex pay questions will be referred to a pay advisor using a case status form.

A compensation advisor in the pay centre will then call back employees reporting issues in priority 1 and 2 groups within 48 hours.

Public Works shared this infographic, outlining the types of priority cases and their timelines:

Click to enlarge.

Public Works is also working on:

  • enhanced tools and additional training for both employees and managers in PWGSC and other departments;
    • the first set of tools will include job aids, tutorials and webcast events made broadly available across the public service in the coming weeks;
  • developing additional mandatory training with the Canada School of Public Service to help employees and managers;
  • a toolkit for managers with reference materials, such as checklists and tips, in an effort to help employees who are experiencing pay issues. The toolkit will be provided to managers through departmental human resources branches;
  • proceeding over the next few months with planned enhancements to Phoenix, which will increase automation, thereby reducing the number of manual steps required and speeding up the timelines; and
  • exploring options with Treasury Board and unions to support employees who have faced financial hardship because of inaccurate or missing pay. The Government will set up a claims process to reimburse employees for the out-of-pocket expenses incurred. This could include penalties for missed payments and insufficient fund charges. Employees are asked to keep track of the expenses incurred. Once the process is set up, instructions will be provided on how to submit claims for reimbursement.

Lastly, it was revealed that additional privacy breaches have occurred; four employees were able to access the names and identification numbers (PRIs) of employees from other departments.

The Deputy Minister said the Office of the Privacy Commissioner has been informed.

Video

Watch CBC’s video of last week’s technical briefing which include questions and answers here:

Other Links

Read the Deputy Minister’s full update here.

Deputy Minister for Phoenix Responds to Reports of Privacy Breaches

Deputy Minister for Phoenix Responds to Reports of Privacy Breaches

July 25, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Last Thursday, the Deputy Minister overseeing Phoenix provided another update to all public servants, this time responding to reports of privacy breaches with the new system.

In the update, the Deputy Minister confirmed the breaches with the first occuring between March and July 2015, and said that both cases were reported to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC).

The first breach consisted of, “Personal Record Identifiers (PRI), employee names and pay amounts that were inadvertently used by IBM to test the system during the development phase of Phoenix.”

The Deputy Minister said that the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, “reviewed the case and determined that appropriate steps had been taken by Public Services and Procurement Canada to address the situation. This information was immediately deleted as soon as the issue was detected.”

The second breach involved, “several managers from four departments reported being able to access information of employees from other federal departments. Contrary to what has been reported in the media, this breach involved only the names and PRIs of employees. These access issues were addressed, and system fixes were put in place to prevent further problems. The OPC was also made aware of this situation.”

Read the Deputy Minister’s response in full below:

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we continue to address employee pay problems.

On Monday, I provided an update on the situation and announced additional actions to help employees who are having issues with their pay. I invite you to read my statement.

Recently, there have been media reports about privacy breaches related to Phoenix. I understand that employees may be concerned about this, and I want to assure you that we take the safeguarding of employee personal information very seriously. Any time we experience a privacy breach, we follow a systematic approach, in accordance with Treasury Board requirements, to assess and address causes and consequences.

We encountered two privacy breach situations during the testing and early implementation of Phoenix. The first situation occurred between March and July 2015, and the second between February and April 2016.

System adjustments and fixes were quickly implemented to prevent further breaches. Our Departmental Oversight Branch thoroughly reviewed these situations and determined that they posed low risk to employee privacy. There was no evidence that employee personal information ever left the hands of federal employees or government contractors. We also reported both of these instances to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) for review.

The first of these two situations involved Personal Record Identifiers (PRI), employee names and pay amounts that were inadvertently used by IBM to test the system during the development phase of Phoenix. The OPC reviewed the case and determined that appropriate steps had been taken by Public Services and Procurement Canada to address the situation. This information was immediately deleted as soon as the issue was detected. In addition, the employee information consisted of scrambled data that would have required technical expertise and significant time to make it readable. The OPC agreed with the Department that the risk to individuals was very low and that no further action by the Department was required.

The second situation occurred shortly after the Phoenix system was launched. Several managers from four departments reported being able to access information of employees from other federal departments. Contrary to what has been reported in the media, this breach involved only the names and PRIs of employees. These access issues were addressed, and system fixes were put in place to prevent further problems. The OPC was also made aware of this situation.

Please note that we are addressing all pay issues as quickly as possible. I look forward to providing you with an update on our progress next week.

Marie Lemay, P.Eng., ing.
Deputy Minister
Public Services and Procurement Canada

Other Links

Read the original update on Public Services and Procurement Canada’s website here.

Message to All Public Servants About Pay – July 8

Message to All Public Servants About Pay – July 8

July 11, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

On Friday, the Deputy Minister overseeing Phoenix, sent another update to all public servants about the pay transformation initiative:

Last week, we promoted a feedback form on our website and asked all employees to use it to report pay issues. We were concerned that employees were unable to report problems through our Pay Centre in Miramichi because of high call volumes and long wait times.

As of Monday this week, 1,710 employees had reported issues through the feedback form, and work is underway to analyze these and provide help as quickly as possible.

We also asked all employees in need of salary support to contact their department or complete the feedback form. Of the submissions received, 52 were requests for emergency salary advances to cover missing pay. These requests were sent to chief financial officers of the responsible departments for immediate action. Any other requests we receive will continue to be sent to the appropriate department or agency on a daily basis.

We also asked all employees in need of salary support to contact their department or complete the feedback form. Of the submissions received, 52 were requests for emergency salary advances to cover missing pay. These requests were sent to chief financial officers of the responsible departments for immediate action. Any other requests we receive will continue to be sent to the appropriate department or agency on a daily basis.

With input received through the feedback form and other channels, including the Pay Centre, we now have a more detailed picture of pay issues. This means we can better assess causes and work more quickly towards solutions.

One of the major challenges we are facing is a backlog of requests for pay, such as overtime or acting. This backlog is being addressed by our temporary pay unit in Gatineau. There are currently 41 employees working in the unit, and another 34 are joining in the coming weeks. Our plan remains to have 100 staff members working in the unit as quickly as possible. The schedule to eliminate the backlog is being finalized and will be shared shortly to provide timelines for when requests will be completed.

We are also seeing that pay requests may not be moving smoothly through the approval process. For example, before extra duty pay is deposited into your bank account, several steps must take place. Both your manager and finance department must give their approval before payment is granted. Employees and managers should review their roles and responsibilities related to Phoenix to ensure that approvals are granted in a timely way.

In closing, let me assure you that we are working very hard to resolve pay issues as quickly as possible. We understand that this situation is challenging and frustrating, and we are committed to ensuring that all public servants are paid promptly and properly. Progress is underway, and we will continue to provide regular updates.

Thank you for your continued patience and understanding.

Marie Lemay, P.Eng., ing.
Deputy Minister
Public Services and Procurement Canada

Other Links

Read the original message on Public Services and Procurement Canada’s website here.

Message to All Public Servants: What to Do if You Have Not Been Paid

Message to All Public Servants: What to Do if You Have Not Been Paid

July 6, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Following last week’s message to all public servants from the Deputy Minister overseeing Phoenix, Public Services and Procurement Canada has provided public servants with a list of steps to follow if they have not been paid.

Steps Public Servants Can Take

Step 1: Verify that your organization is served by the Pay Centre

If it is, please proceed to step 2.

If your organization is not on this list, please contact your manager.

Step 2: Contact your manager

  • Tell your manager that you are not getting paid. Your manager can explore the reasons why you may not be getting paid. Some reasons may include:
    • back to work after a long sick leave;
    • changes in your work schedule (progressive return);
    • changes in employment status such as from a term to indeterminate;
    • you are on maternity leave; and
    • you are a new employee.

Step 3: Contact the Pay Centre

Initiate a pay action request

If the Pay Centre needs paperwork to ensure you get paid, your manager can initiate a pay action request.

With a pay action request, the following options are available:

  • an emergency salary advance:
    • it takes about five to seven days to get paid after the request is processed; and
  • a review of your pay file to fix the issues:
    • review the Pay Centre service standards to determine the priority assigned to your case.
Order of case priorities
  1. New hires;
  2. Return from leave without pay and terminations;
  3. Maternity top ups; and
  4. Changes to pay such as promotions and acting pay.
What your manager may need from you to complete an emergency salary advance
  • Your personal record identifier (PRI);
  • The dates that you have not been paid;
  • A void cheque or a printed copy of your bank account information;
    • You will receive your payment by direct deposit; and
  • Your current classification and salary.
Complete the Pay Action Request form

Once all forms are completed the manager should send them to your human resources department.

Calling the Pay Centre

The Contact Centre is currently experiencing high call volumes. Public servants may get a busy signal and calls may be disconnected. Public Services and Procurement Canada is apologizing for this inconvenience and has said they appreciate the patience of public servants during this time.

  • In Canada or the United States: 1-855-686-4729
    • Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm local time
  • Outside Canada and the United States: 506-424-4330
    • Monday to Friday, 7:30 am to 8:00 pm Atlantic Time
  • TTY (for persons with hearing loss): 1-855-393-1558 or 506-424-4085
  • Executive Services: 1-844-423-4765
    • Monday to Friday, 7:30 am to 8:00 pm Atlantic Time

Step 4: Follow up

If you were unsuccessful in resolving the issue, you may follow up on your case by completing the Phoenix Case Status Request form.

You may also email the Client Satisfaction Bureau, which is a team of dedicated compensation advisors to quickly resolve issues.

Questions and Answers

I’m a new employee. How long will it take to receive my first pay?

It is important to note that the Government of Canada is paying in arrears; which means that you are paid for the weeks you work. Once all necessary information is received by the Pay Centre, you should receive your first pay within 4 to 6 weeks.

How is the Pay Centre addressing issues?
  • Phoenix experts are on site and online;
  • Forty new compensation advisor trainees were hired in January 2016 and have started to process cases;
  • Fifty additional temporary resources have been hired to answer calls; and
  • A web-based tool is now available to allow employees to receive an update about their cases within 48 hours.

Other Links

Message to All Public Servants From the Deputy Minister Overseeing Phoenix

Message to All Public Servants From the Deputy Minister Overseeing Phoenix

June 30, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

The Deputy Minister overseeing the pay transformation initiative ‘Phoenix’ from Public Services and Procurement Canada, issued the following statement to all public servants:

As part of the Government of Canada pay transformation, Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) introduced a new pay system called Phoenix. The implementation of Phoenix has been a major undertaking, and although a significant amount of planning went into preparing for the implementation, some employees are having problems with their pay. This situation is unacceptable, and PSPC is working hard to ensure that all employees are paid what they are owed.

While many of the issues raised have been addressed, more needs to be done, and the remaining issues are not being addressed as quickly as we would like.

To that effect, on June 17, the Honourable Judy M. Foote, Minister of Public Services and Procurement, announced the creation of a temporary pay unit to accelerate the resolution of pay issues. On June 27, PSPC welcomed the first employees of the unit. As of next week, they will begin tackling backlogged requests. Over the next few months, we expect this unit will resolve many long-standing, frustrating pay issues. Drawn from various departments, 63 employees have already agreed to join the unit, and we expect to reach 100 staff members.

We are monitoring progress to ensure pay issues are resolved. As this work progresses, I encourage employees experiencing pay issues to log their problem on our Phoenix feedback form. It is important that you report any and all pay problems so we can address these situations as quickly as possible.

If you are facing financial hardship because of a pay problem, you should first contact your manager to request salary support, such as a salary advance. Alternatively, you can complete the Phoenix feedback form, and we will ensure your request is forwarded to your department with a priority status. There is no reason why employees should be placed in challenging situations because of inaccurate pay.

We are committed to resolving pay issues as quickly as possible. Progress is underway, and we will continue to provide regular updates.

Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Marie Lemay, P.Eng., ing.
Deputy Minister
Public Services and Procurement Canada

Other Links

Access the Phoenix feedback form by clicking here.

Read the Deputy Minister’s offical message here.

Read the offical news release, announcing the temporary satellite pay centre in the National Capital Region here.

Unions File Notice of Application With Federal Court of Canada Over Phoenix

Unions File Notice of Application With Federal Court of Canada Over Phoenix

June 29, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Desperate public servants have been going public and sharing their personal horror stories of having to survive months without pay due to the problems the public service has been experiencing with its new pay system, Phoenix:

In one emotional interview, another public servant broke down on air saying pay centre employees terminated her file instead of transferring it when she changed departments and since then, her file has just been sitting on a supervisor’s desk with no activity.

“We try to survive. That’s the most we can do,” she said, crying.

Public Works has taken action by setting up a temporary satellite pay centre in the National Capital Region.

However, unions have said enough.

Thirteen public sector unions filed a Notice of Application with the Federal Court yesterday, seeking a court order directing the government to implement a pay administration system that meets its obligations under the Federal Administration Act and the Directive on Terms and Conditions of Employment.

Those thirteen unions are:

  • Association of Justice Counsel;
  • Canadian Association of Professional Employees;
  • Canadian Federal Pilots Association;
  • Canadian Merchant Service Guild;
  • Canadian Military Colleges Faculty Association;
  • Federal Government Dockyard Chargehands Association;
  • Federal Government Dockyard Trades and Labour Council (West);
  • Federal Government Dockyard Trades and Labour Council (East);
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers;
  • Profession Association of Foreign Service Officers;
  • Public Service Alliance of Canada;
  • Research Council Employees’ Association; and
  • Unifor.

In its statement, the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) said:

The federal government is responsible for paying public service workers on time for the work they do. The unions are demanding that the federal government meet its legal duty to provide timely and accurate pay for public service employees.

The new Phoenix pay system is not working and hurting many public service workers. It is also putting excessive stress on the employees who process pay under the new system. Since its implementation, Phoenix has exhibited ongoing and significant systemic problems in the administration of pay for public service employees.

The application states Phoenix has resulted in the following pay system problems:

  • Outright failure to pay employees;
  • Delayed and inaccurate payments;
  • Failure to pay overtime and extra duty pay; and
  • Failure to process information necessary for disability insurance, employment insurance and pension payments.

The unions argue that these ongoing circumstances raise concerns that affect all public service employees, constitute a breach of the employer’s duty to provide timely and accurate pay for public service employees.

PSAC is calling on public servants to send letters to the Minister of Public Works to send a message that Phoenix needs to be fixed immediately.

According to PSAC, more than 2000 letters have been sent documenting serious issues so far.

Other Links

To participate in PSAC’s letter campaign, click here.

Read PSAC’s official statement here.

Union Concerned Over Implementation of New PS-Wide Pay System ‘Phoenix’

Union Concerned Over Implementation of New PS-Wide Pay System ‘Phoenix’

April 7, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

On Tuesday, one of the largest unions for the federal public service issued a statement over its concern about how ‘Phoenix,’ the new public service-wide pay system is being implemented.

February marked the first wave of implementation with over thirty departments and agencies adopting the new system. This month is the second wave with over sixty departments and agencies making the switch.

Amidst reports of frustrated public servants with delayed acting and overtime pay by months, as well as low morale at the pay centre in Miramichi, the Public Service Alliance of Canada titled its statement, “Public Works needs to slow down implementation of Phoenix pay system.”

Public Works needs to slow down implementation of Phoenix pay system

For some time now, and since the new pay system Phoenix was launched at the Public Works Pay Centre, we have been hearing from our members of numerous problems and concerns.

PSAC in discussions with employer

We are taking these concerns seriously and following up with the employer to see if they can slow down the implementation of the new system until errors can be corrected to avoid future problems.

The PSAC has already communicated with management that they either need to add more staff at the pay centre or slow down the pace files are being transferred.

Our members at Miramichi

Our members working in Miramichi are dedicated, concerned by the problems and working hard but are under a tremendous amount of pressure.

Information

We will keep you appraised of the situation as soon as we hear updates. If you have any concerns about the system, please contact your component.

‘Phoenix’ replaces the previous 40 year-old pay system with many modern features including the elimination of timesheets, as well as public servants now being able to manually change their banking information themselves in the system without delays to pay.

Video

Training

Public servants can take the free online self-paced training offered by the Canada School of Public Service:

  1. Phoenix for Authorizers under Section 33 of the Financial Administration Act (C600)
  2. Phoenix Manager Self Service (C602)
  3. Phoenix Navigation Overview (C603)
  4. Phoenix Overview for Compensation Advisors (C604)
  5. Phoenix Self Service for Employees (C601)

Other Links

For links to webcasts on Phoenix, as well as fact sheets and FAQs, click here.

Read PSAC’s statement on their website here.

New Public Service Pay System ‘Phoenix’ Launches Today

New Public Service Pay System ‘Phoenix’ Launches Today

February 24, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Public Works has been preparing public servants for the arrival of the public service’s new pay system, which launches in some departments and agenices today:

The new pay system called ‘Phoenix’ replaces the previous 40 year-old pay system and is being described as:

“A modern, commercial off-the-shelf solution that is replacing the government’s outdated pay system, and includes streamlined and modernized business processes. Phoenix will provide increased automation and self-service, as well as seamless integration with the Government of Canada’s Human Resources Management System (GC HRMS, PeopleSoft).”

Similar to the email transformation initiative that was supposed to make things easier for all by streamlining and reducing costs, the pay transformation initiative is also supposed to bring in annual savings of over $70 million for the government starting in 2016-17. As well, processes will be streamlined at the pay centre in Miramichi with the addition of another 550 jobs being created there.

So what does this mean for me?

Many modern features such as no more timesheets and public servants now being able to manually change their banking information themselves in the system without delays and paperwork are now available. Watch this quick two minute video to find out what other features are now available for employees and managers:

Rollout Schedule for Departments/Agenices

February 2016

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AGR) (includes Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency)
Canada School of Public Service (CES)
Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC)
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (EAA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (ICA)
Canadian Grain Commission (CGC)
Canadian Heritage (PCH) (includes Canadian Conservation Institute, Canadian Heritage Information Network)
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (NED)
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (RTC)
Copyright Board Canada (COP)
Department of Finance Canada (FIN)
Environment and Climate Change Canada (DOE)
Farm Products Council of Canada (FPN)
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (ESO)
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) (includes Canadian Coast Guard)
Global Affairs Canada (EXT) (includes part of Passport Canada, Physical Resources Bureau)
Health Canada (NHW)
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB)
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IMC) (includes part of Passport Canada)
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (IAN)
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (DUS) (includes Canadian Intellectual Property Office, Industrial Technologies Office, Measurement Canada, Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy Canada)
National Defence (DND) (includes Defence Research and Development Canada, Canadian Forces Housing Agency)
Natural Resources Canada (RSN)
Northern Pipeline Agency Canada (NPA)
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board Canada (PXR)
Privy Council Office (PCO)
Public Health Agency of Canada (AHS)
Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCM)
Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIR)
Shared Services Canada (GSS)
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBD)
Veterans Affairs Canada (DVA)
Veterans Review and Appeal Board (AVC)

April 2016

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada (ATS)
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACO)
Canada Border Services Agency (BSF)
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (FRD)
Canada Employment Insurance Commission (CSD)
Canada Revenue Agency (NAR)
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (OCC)
Canadian Human Rights Commission (HRC)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CRI)
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CIC)
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CSN)
Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSI)
Canadian Space Agency (CSA)
Canadian Transportation Agency (ATN)
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP (RPP)
Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSE)
Correctional Service Canada (PEN)
Courts Administration Service (CAJ)
Elections Canada (CEO)
Employment and Social Development Canada (CSD) (includes part of Passport Canada)
Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FNA)
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (CFC)
House of Commons (Employees) (HOC)
House of Commons (Members) (MPA)
Indian Oil and Gas Canada (IOG)
Infrastructure Canada (INF)
International Joint Commission (Canadian Section) (IJC)
Justice Canada (JUS)
Library and Archives Canada (BAL)
Library of Parliament (LIB)
Military Grievances External Review Committee (FCG)
Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada (CPM)
National Energy Board (ENR)
National Film Board (NFB)
National Research Council Canada (NRC)
Office of the Auditor General of Canada (AUD)
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada (FJA)
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada (LOB)
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (COL)
Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner (SRT)
Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner (ETH)
Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada (IPC)
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (IPC)
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada (INT)
Office of the Secretary to the Governor General (GGS)
Office of the Senate Ethics Officer (ESN)
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada (SIF)
Parks Canada (CAP)
Parole Board of Canada (NPB)
Polar Knowledge Canada (CHR)
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPD)
Public Safety Canada (PSP)
Public Services and Procurement Canada (SVC) (includes Translation Bureau)
RCMP External Review Committee (REC)
Science and Engineering Research Canada (NSE)
Senate (Employees) (SEN)
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSH)
Statistics Canada (STC)
Statistics Survey Operations (SYT)
Status of Women Canada (CSW)
Supreme Court of Canada (SUC)
Telefilm Canada (FDC)
The Correctional Investigator Canada (OCI)
The National Battlefields Commission (NBC)
Transport Canada (MOT)
Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB)
Western Economic Diversification Canada (WCO)

Training

Public servants can take the free online self-paced training offered by the Canada School of Public Service:

  1. Phoenix for Authorizers under Section 33 of the Financial Administration Act (C600)
  2. Phoenix Manager Self Service (C602)
  3. Phoenix Navigation Overview (C603)
  4. Phoenix Overview for Compensation Advisors (C604)
  5. Phoenix Self Service for Employees (C601)

Other Links

For links to webcasts on Phoenix, as well as fact sheets and FAQs, click here.